OppenheimerFunds employees are big supporters of the Boston community. This year volunteers from the management firm helped make blankets, superhero capes and built beds for toddlers at the Distribution Symposium.

OppenheimerFunds

A "unique culture' where employees are greatly encouraged to speak their minds

Second place, managers with 1,000 or more employees

Competition for today's knowledge worker is intense, says Art Steinmetz, who oversees $220 billion in AUM and around 2,000 employees, as chairman and CEO of OppenheimerFunds in New York.

That's led the manager, a first-time winner in Pensions & Investments' Best Places to Work in Money Management survey, to up its game, Mr. Steinmetz said.

“In Denver, we've just opened a collaboration space downtown to complement our office campus. In New York, we've just opened a new conference center and employee lounge for employees to relax and to encourage cross-team meetings.”

“While people come and go, the spirit of the firm remains strong due to the values,” one employee noted in BPTW survey. “We hold ourselves to the highest ethical standards and always act in the best interest of our clients. Having worked at other firms, I can attest to OFI's unique culture and can't imagine working anywhere else.”

When an Oppenheimer employee survey a few years ago showed some concerns over speaking up, Mr. Steinmetz says the company embarked on a project to educate and inform all employees, and managers specifically, on how to speak up. “We've seen a very large improvement and we take this feedback seriously,” he said.

On career development, “whether lateral or upward, employees can find new challenges and get involved,” another employee said in the BPTW survey. Diversity and inclusion efforts and philanthropic partnerships and programs also make me proud to work here.”

Mr. Steinmetz highlights the company's recent math literacy program, 10,000 Kids by 2020, with the National Museum of Mathematics, its work with the Boys and Girls Clubs, and Cross-Cultural Solutions, a group that brings employees to developing countries for a weeklong engagement. “Our focus on STEM learning, overall, will help build the next generation of knowledge workers and a more diverse pool of employees,” said Mr. Steinmetz. 

This article originally appeared in the December 12, 2016 print issue as, "OppenheimerFunds".